Garden Towns

Property prices 42% higher in garden hotspots



Properties located in areas across England with the most residential gardens are valued 42% higher on average than the rest of the country, according to a new study.

Research from estate agents Emoov.co.uk analysed areas with the highest percentage of residential gardens in relation to the total land use in each area and its subsequent impact on property prices.

The estate agent revealed that areas with residential gardens that take up 30% or more of the total landscape have an average price of £343,344, 42% higher than the average of £242,286 in England.

Areas that have gardens that make up 20-30% of the local landscape are priced at £303,545, 25% higher than the national average.

Meanwhile, locations that have gardens that make up 10% or less of the total land have an average house price of £255,159, 5% higher than the national average.

“A garden is right up there with some of the most desirable features of a property and so it’s important to maximise its property sale potential, particularly as we head towards British Summer Time,” said Russell Quirk, founder and CEO of Emoov.co.uk.

“While the presence, positioning and size of the garden are ultimately the factors that dictate the price premium of your property, a well-presented outdoor space can be the tipping point in converting a viewer to a buyer.

“Buying a property is an emotive process and so enabling someone to picture themselves in your garden during those long summer afternoons can make all the difference.

“You don’t have to get Ground Force in for a complete renovation, but make sure you get those smaller, simple jobs done, such as mowing the lawn, painting the fence and so on.”


Sign up to our newsletter to receive more news like this story

I accept that by joining the DFT mailing list, I will receive relevant news and promotional material via DFT on behalf of its partners and advertisers. Your data will not be passed on to any third party.
No, thanks, just the news please.



Leave a comment


×